Community Development Capacity Building Programme and Health Inequalities Survey

Health inequalities are the unfair and avoidable differences in the health of people in our society. They are the result of imbalances of power, wealth and resources and are produced and shaped by factors such as quality of housing, educational attainment, employment opportunities, physical environment, access to services and level of social connections known as the social determinants. These imbalances mean that no one’s health is as good as it could be in Northern Ireland.

 

Elevate is a Community Development Capacity Building Programme delivered by the Community Development & Health Network (CDHN), supported by the Public Health Agency (PHA). With a focus on tackling health inequalities, a key objective of Elevate is the development and delivery of evidence-based training and learning opportunities across Northern Ireland. 

To help shape content and make the Elevate programme relevant for you, Prospect Awards CIC invites you to take part on this online survey. Your views and experiences are invaluable so please share them with us, thank you!

The Survey will take about 3 minutes to complete (a little longer if you complete some of the free text boxes)

As part of the Mapping activity, we aim to build up a profile of organisations that provide community development support and training in Northern Ireland and share that information to help build capacity across the sector.

Please fill in the survey below or click on the link and complete the survey  in – thank you! 🙂

 

 

Elevate Programme

In October 2016, a ten-year approach to transforming health and social care was launched by the Department of Health, in a document entitled “Health and Wellbeing 2026: Delivering Together”. This ambitious plan, the Health and Social Care Transformation Programme, was the response to a report produced by an expert panel, led by Professor Rafael Bengoa.  The panel had been tasked with considering the best configuration of health and social care services in Northern Ireland.

Delivering Together set out a long term roadmap, together with initial priorities, to make an ambitious start towards this reform of our health and social care system Tackling inequality is a matter of fairness and social justice which requires action across the social determinants, between government departments and within communities across the whole of Northern Ireland. Improving health and reducing health inequalities therefore requires co-ordinated action across government, health and social care, and a range of partners across community, voluntary and independent sectors.

Health inequalities are unfair and avoidable differences in the health of people in our society. They are the result of imbalances of power, wealth and resources and are produced and shaped by factors such as quality of housing, educational attainment, employment opportunities, physical environment, access to services and level of social connections known as the social determinants. These imbalances mean that no one’s health is as good as it could be in Northern Ireland.

The Public Health Authority tendered for the implementation of this programme for 2019/20.  CDHN won the contract to deliver the Capacity Building Programme.  Prospect Awards CIC, along with the Rural Community Network and Community Evaluation NI along with Minus 40 are subcontracted to deliver certain elements of the programme.   More details of the Elevate Programme can be accessed at the CDHN website and the report ‘Expansion of Community Development Approaches’ by  the PHA is available  on this page.

 

 

Expansion of Community Development Approaches Report

Prospect Awards CIC  is engaged with the Elevate Programme in several ways.  A quick overview of our main workstreams are outlined below

Train the Trainers Programme

Ongoing in the Programme

Level 3 Award in Education and Training to support partners and mentoring organisations in delivering their training input

On-line Assessment tool

Developing an initial online assessment tool for groups using the Community Development National Occupational Standards (CDNOS)

Current services mapping

Reviewing the scope, availability and relevance of community development training and health inequalities

Health Inequalities and the Social Determinants of Health

The report highlights that 7.7 million people are living in persistent poverty. These people have spent all or most of the last four years (and more) in poverty. Persistence rates are particularly high for children and working-age adults who live in workless families and families with a disabled person. Given that we know that long periods in poverty can be particularly damaging to people’s lives and prospects, this is a significant concern.

The report also highlights a range of groups that have previously been under-represented in official measures of poverty. For example, our approach suggests that nearly half of the 14.2 million people in poverty live in families with a disabled person. Compared to previous measures, it also shows that those families struggling to make ends meet because of childcare and housing costs and those who lack a financial buffer to fall back on are much more likely to be in poverty.

A tendency to focus on incomes only has meant that we have previously failed to adequately consider the impact that a lack of financial resilience and high essential costs have on families lives. The Commission’s metric ends that trend by developing a clear methodology for understanding these issues

UN Report on the Social Determinants of Health

‘Good health involves reducing levels of educational failure, reducing insecurity and unemployment and improving housing standards.  Societies that enable all citizens to play a full and useful role in the social, economic and cultural life of their society will be healthier than those where people face insecurity, exclusion and deprivation’

(WHO. Social Determinants of Health 2nd Ed p17)

UN Sustainable Development Goals

”The UK is committed to the delivery of the Sustainable Development Goals. The most effective way to do this is by ensuring that the Goals are fully embedded in planned activity of each Government department. The most effective mechanism for coordinating implementation is the departmental planning process.”

‘The 17 Sustainable Development Goals (also known as SDGs) were formally agreed by the UN at the Sustainable Development Summit in New York in September 2015, and came into effect from January 2016. The Goals are an internationally agreed set of global high level targets relating to international development to tackle poverty and inequality.

A mapping exercise has been carried out to highlight how the Outcomes Delivery Plan 2018 – 19 aligns with the SDGs.  The monitoring arrangements for the Programme for Government will show how Northern Ireland is progressing towards the SDGs.

Contact us for more details using the form below 🙂

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